Sunday, 30 July 2017

Nurgle Rhino [WIP - Rust Streaks, Stains & Pools]

This Nurgle Rhino project is starting to drag on a bit (... ya think?). So to move things along at a faster pace, I intend to double the amount of posts per week which in turn should result in more weathering completed in the same space of time. That's the idea anyway and so far it's working. Granted the organic bits and panel lining earlier in the week wasn't much progress but it did set up the first (and possibly only ... time will tell) 'exponential step' of the weathering process. A step which I define as the one that starts bringing all the separate weathering elements together and make it work.

Nurgle Rhino work-in-progress: weathering rust streaks

This 'exponential step' involved the use of enamel weathering products from AK Interactive namely Rust Streaks, Light Rust Wash and regular White Spirit. One key characteristic of enamel or oil-based products is the ability to manipulate the resulting paint job with white spirit. After allowing the rust streaks (painted straight out of the bottle) to dry for about 10 to 15 minutes, I used a brush moistened with white spirit to soften the edges of the painted streaks. Essentially the excess painted rust streaks were being removed by the white spirit and what remained was being blended for a 'softer look'. 

Rust Streaks Step 1 of 2: Paint downward strokes of rust streaks, straight from the jar
Vertical rust streaks painted with enamel paints straight from the bottle
Rust Streaks Step 2 of 2: Use white spirit to 'soften' or blend the rust streaks, in upward and downward strokes
Vertical rust streaks softened/blended using white spirit, a solvent for enamel paints

Another less obvious rust effect added was rust stains on the bottom hull using a diluted light rust wash. In addition, the pooling of rust was recreated on the upper hull using more concentrated light rust wash. Both rust effects help complement the overall rusted look of the Nurgle Rhino (see below).

Light Rust Wash - diluted with white spirit to create rust stains
Rust stains on the insides of the Rhino track wheels
Light Rust Wash - used straight from the bottle to create rust pools
Rust pools accumulate around raised areas of the upper hull, which is admittedly a tad over-weathered

In my opinion, rust streaks are an essential component of the rust weathering process. Without rust streaks the level of realism drops down a few notches. The following images are a series of 360 shots at 45 degree intervals of the Nurgle Rhino with rust streaks in place. 

Nurgle Rhino - work-in-progress, rust streaks and all (front view)
Rust streaks help tie-up the separate weathering effects up until now
Rust streaks were softened considerably to avoid a sense of over-weathering
Rust streaks are an essential component in the weathering process
Nurgle Rhino - work-in-progress, rust streaks and all (back view)
Without rust streaks - the level of realism drops down a few notches
Still no idea what to paint behind 'Lucy' the head ornament on the lower right corner of the right-side hull
Even with rust streaks the Nurgle Rhino still lacks depth which only filters/glazes and dust/dirt effects can overcome

Applied earlier (see previous post), the acrylic semi-gloss clear coat helps provide a protective coating to the underlying paint job, against the enamel weathering steps shown above.

Clear acrylic semi-gloss coat forms a protective coating for the subsequent enamel paint weathering

Future to-do lists include adding depth to the flat hull colour via filters/glazes; painting the light in searchlight; weathering the tracks; and adding subtle dust/dirt deposits for yet more depth. And as the Nurgle Rhino nears completion, I've actually started working on another Star Wars project that might be included in alternate blog postings. But I'll likely finish up with the W40K transport before posting updates on the Incom T-47 Snowspeeder. At least things will brighten up colour-wise from the dull rust hues of the Nurgle Rhino. Until then, thanks for reading and have a lovely weekend.

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16 comments:

  1. That looks just like real 😮!
    You've certainly mastered this technique.

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    1. Thank you for your very kind words! :)

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  2. Welcome bach with next great work. It will be epic!

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    1. Many thanks Michał ... this project has taken so long that I'll be glad when it's finally over and I can move on.

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  3. This is just coming along lovely.. or ugly - or both. It's lugly!

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    1. LoL ... I honestly think it's ugly but I will gladly take lugly :)

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  4. Looking fantastic ! I'm looking forward to the finished model.
    Greetings

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  5. Incredibly realistic. I've seen that exact effect in real life in seaside facilities and things of the like. Simply amazing!!

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    1. Thank you Suber! :) Sadly I see the same effects on my house gates - colour and all. I really need to find the time to remove the rust and repaint (my house gates) as its the neighbourhood eyesore!!!

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  6. More superb work on the weathering. :)

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  7. It's coming along nicely I see!

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    1. The end is finally coming and I can start on a new project. And as for the next step, I have you to thank for it. :)

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